Ubuntu Cookbook

Overview

This is a cookbook specific to Ubuntu running in a crouton chroot jail on a chromebook. So – much of this will be portable to Ubuntu in general, but some will not. Your mileage may vary.

Ubuntu Desktop Metapackages

  • gnome-desktop-environment: This installs the GNOME Desktop environment, a graphical interface to use on your Debian system. It includes a wide range of applications, including programs for email, messaging, word processing, financial accounting, conferencing, and more.
  • kde: This metapackage includes all the official modules released with KDE that are not specific to development. In addition to the core KDE modules, this includes multimedia, networking, personal information manager (PIM), graphics, education, games, web development, system administration tools, and other artwork and utilities.
  • kde-base: This metapackage includes the nucleus of KDE, namely the minimal package set necessary to run KDE as a desktop environment. This includes the window manager, taskbar, control center, a text editor, file manager, web browser, X terminal emulator, and many other programs and components.
  • xfce: This package is a meta-package; it depends on the core packages of the Xfce4 desktop environment and recommends some extra Xfce4 packages. If you intend to use Xfce4 and want the full experience then installing this package and the packages it Recommends is a great place to start. If you just want to pick and choose the core components then feel free to remove this package,

Ubuntu System Metapackages

  • edubuntu-desktop: This package depends on all of the packages in the edubuntu desktop system
  • edubuntu-server: This package depends on all of the packages in the edubuntu server system
  • kubuntu-desktop: Similar to ubuntu-desktop, but with KDE and related software instead of Gnome
  • ubuntu-desktop: In addition to ubuntu-minimal and ubuntu-standard, this package depends on all of the packages in the Ubuntu desktop system. It installs a desktop environment (GNOME) and lots of software for home and office use.
  • ubuntu-minimal: This package depends on all of the packages in the Ubuntu minimal system, that is a functional command-line system with the following capabilities: Boot, Detect hardware, Connect to a network, Install packages, and Perform basic diagnostics. It is also used to help ensure proper upgrades, so it is recommended that it not be removed.
  • ubuntu-restricted-extras: Introduced in Feisty, this package depends on some commonly used packages in the Ubuntu multiverse repository. It installs support for java, flash, microsoft truetype fonts, and many multimedia codecs.
  • ubuntu-standard: In addition to ubuntu-minimal, this package depends on all of the packages in the Ubuntu standard system. This set of packages provides a comfortable command-line Unix-like environment.
  • xubuntu-desktop: The XFCE desktop environment, and all the software distributed with Xubuntu
  • lubuntu-desktop: The LXDE desktop environment, and all the software distributed with Lubuntu

Development Tools

  • Oracle Java:
    • Download the current Oracle JDK from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/overview/index.html
    • Move / copy the tgz file to the user home directory
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory that looks like ‘~/jdk1.7.0_45’ with a ‘bin’ subdirectory.
    • In the user home directory, edit ‘.bashrc’ and append the following to the end of the file ‘PATH=${PATH}:~/jdk1.7.0_45/bin’ (or the equivalent in your install).
    • Reboot to force the new PATH.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘java -version’ and confirm that java was found and executed.
  • ADB:
    • Download the Debian binary from http://packages.debian.org/sid/android-tools-adb
    • Install with ‘sudo apt-get install android-tools-adb*’ in the download directory.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘adb version’ to confirm that adb was found and executed.
  • Fastboot:
    • Download the Debian binary from http://packages.debian.org/sid/android-tools-fastboot
    • Install with ‘sudo apt-get install android-tools-fastboot*’ in the download directory
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘fastboot help’ to confirm that adb was found and executed.
  • Android Studio:
    • Download the Linux/64bit install package from http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing/studio.html
    • Copy the tgz file to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory that looks like ‘~/android-studio’ with an ‘bin’ subdirectory.
    • In the user home directory, edit ‘.bashrc’ and append the following to the end of the file ‘PATH=${PATH}:~/android-studio/bin’ (or the equivalent in your install).
    • Reboot to force the new PATH.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘studio.sh’ to confirm that Android Studio was found and executed.
    • When prompted, select the directory for the Oracle Java JDK.
    • JDK: There are some cases where the IDE has problems finding the JDK. By mapping the JDK explicitly, this can be resolved.
      • Use your favorite editor to open ‘~/andoid-studio/bin/studio.sh’
      • Right below the ‘#!/bin/sh’ line add the following line ‘JAVA_HOME=/home/joeuser/jdk1.7.0_45″ – where you substitute your username and jdk path, providing an complete path to your JDK.
      • Save and exit.
  • Dart Editor:
    • Download the Linux/64bit install package from https://www.dartlang.org/tools/editor/
    • Copy the tgz file to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory that looks like ‘~/dart’.
    • In the user home directory, edit ‘.bashrc’ and append the following to the end of the file ‘PATH=${PATH}:~/dart’ (or the equivalent in your install).
    • Reboot to force the new PATH.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘DartEditor’ to confirm that Dart Editor was found and executed.
    • JDK: There are some cases where the IDE has problems finding the JDK. By mapping the JDK explicitly, this can be resolved.
      • Use your favorite editor to open ‘~/dart/DartEditor.ini’
      • At the very top of the file insert(as two lines):
        -vm
        /home/joeuser/jdk1.7.0_45/bin/java
      • Replace this path with the corresponding path on your system, save and exit.
  • Netbeans
    • Download your choice of a Linux/64bit install package from https://netbeans.org/downloads/
    • Copy the file name (something like) ‘netbeans-7.4-javase-linux.sh’ to the user home directory.
    • Open a terminal and enter ./netbeans-7.4-javase-linux.sh’, and follow directions.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘~/netbeans-7.4/bin/netbeans’ to confirm that Netbeans was found and executed.
  • Eclipse
    • Download your choice of a Linux/64bit install package from http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/
    • Copy the tgz file name (something like) ‘eclipse-standard-kepler…’ to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory named ‘~/eclipse’.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘~/eclipse/eclipse’ to confirm that Eclipse was found and executed.
    • JDK: There are some cases where the IDE has problems finding the JDK. By mapping the JDK explicitly, this can be resolved.
      • Use your favorite editor to open ‘~/eclipse/eclipse.ini
      • At the very top of the file insert(as two lines):

        -vm
        /home/joeuser/jdk1.7.0_45/bin/java
      • Replace this path with the corresponding path on your system, save and exit.

Privacy / Security Tools

  • TrueCrypt
    • Download the Linux/64bit Standard install package from http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads
    • Copy the tgz file to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a file that looks like ‘~/truecrypt-7.1a-setup-x64’.
    • Open a terminal and enter ./truecrypt-7.1a-setup-x64′, and follow directions.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘truecrypt’ to confirm that TrueCrypt was found and executed.
  • BitTorrent Sync
    • Download the Linux/64bit install package from http://www.bittorrent.com/sync/downloads
    • Copy the tgz file to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory that looks like ‘~/btsync_glibc23_x65’.
    • On the Unity Desktop, click on the gear in the upper right corner and select ‘Startup Applications’. Under Command, browse to the btsync directory and select the ‘btsync’ app. The app should startup when the chroot is started.
    • Reboot to force the app startup.
    • Open a browser with URL ‘localhost:8888/gui’ to confirm that Bit Torrent sync is running. Configure according to directions.
  • TOR Browser
    • Download your choice of a Linux/64bit install package from https://www.torproject.org/download/download
    • Copy the tgz file name (something like) ‘tor-browser-gnu-linux-x86_64…’ to the user home directory.
    • Extract the files in the home directory. This will create a directory named ‘~/tor-browser_en-US’.
    • Open a terminal and enter ‘~/tor-browser_en-US/start-tor-browser’ to confirm that TOR Browser was found and executed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s